Dave's Astronomy    Globular Clusters
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Images of globular clusters
M3 - Globular Cluster
M3 - Globular Cluster
M3 is a large, bright globular cluster found in the constellation Canes Venatici.

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2015-Apr-29

LRGB 5x2min + 5x3min, total 25min
SGP, MaximDL, CPT
MN190, EQ8, 8300M, A80Mf, LSX2

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M13 - Hercules Cluster
M13 - Hercules Cluster
M13 is large, bright globular cluster found in the Hercules constellation. It is easy to see with a small telescope, even from an urban night sky.

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2016-Apr-14

RGB 30x4m + L 30x2m, total 7hr
SGP, MaximDL, Corel
MN190, STF8300M, EQ8
GSO 6.6N, 2X Barlow, LSX2

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M15 - Cluster in Pegasus
M15 - Cluster in Pegasus
M15 is a globular cluster located in the Pegasus constellation.

Kootenay Plains, Alberta, Canada
2012-Sep-14

ISO800 3x30s + ISO1000 1x30s, total 120s
CCP2,DSS,CPT
NP101is, NEQ6, D90

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M56 - Globular Cluster in Lyra
M56 - Globular Cluster in Lyra
M56 is a globular cluster found in the constellation Lyra.

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2016-Apr-29

L 7x2m + RGB 7x4m, total 105m
SGP, MaximDL, Corel
MN190, STF-8300M, EQ8
A80Mf, TV2XBarlow, LSX2

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M92 - Cluster in Hercules
M92 - Cluster in Hercules
M92 is a globular cluster found in the constellatin Hercules. This is a bright cluster and is also known as NGC6341.

Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
2016-May-03

L 40x2m + RGB 28x4m + RGB 12x5m,
Total 9hr 56m
SGP, MaximDL, Corel
MN190, STF-9300M, EQ8
A80Mf, TV2xBarlow, LSX2

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Globular clusters are densely packed spherical groupings of stars. Usually found outside the main plane of the galaxy, the stars are drawn together by mutual gravity and over time form a sphere.

The globulars shown here are among the brighter ones in the sky. Most, if not all can be spotted with binoculers, even from the city. Many can be spotted with the naked eye from a moderately dark location. Globulars found on the Messier list are generally big, bright and can be quite spectaular when seen through a larger scope.

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